Low Income Housing Doesn’t Impact Property Values

“As markets across the country stretch tight with low inventory and high selling prices, many homeowners fear, and even boycott, low-income housing. Specifically, homeowners are wary of the integration of HUD supported Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) housing projects. Why? Some believe that these government supported homes may lower the values of properties nearby.

A new study powered by Trulia wipes these fears clean by setting the table with surprising news:  in the nation’s 20 least affordable housing markets, low-income housing built during a 10-year span shows no negative effect on nearby home values”

(via New Study Shows Low Income Housing Does NOT Impact Property Values | RISMedia’s Housecall)

Surban” communities—suburban neighborhoods offering the most desired features of urban and suburban living—will attract the most households in the United States over the next ten years, according to a new ULI report, Demographic Strategies for Real Estate. Many people will choose to rent rather than own homes, pushing up demand for single-family rentals.

Despite the continued revival of urban downtowns, the suburbs will draw at least 80 percent of the coming wave of new households as younger families seek urban amenities combined with more kid-friendly housing and good schools typically associated with the suburbs

The Bigger Climate Picture

It’s really difficult to quantify some of the effects of climate change, but new research paints a clearer picture. Without action, there’s much more at stake for everyone, everyday.


“The relationship is really clear,” said Edward Miguel, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley, who has studied the issue. “Extremes in climate lead to more violence, more killing, more war, more land riots in Brazil, more sectarian violence in India. It’s pretty stunning how the relationship between climate and violence holds across the globe.”

The starting point is that heat makes people irritable. 

Researchers have found hot days linked to more angry honking in Arizona, and more road rage and car accidents in Spain. Scholars have done the math and found that on hot days a major-league baseball pitcher is more likely to retaliate for a perceived offense and deliberately hit a batter.

“High temperatures,” that study finds, are “lowering inhibitions against retaliation.”

On hot days, property crimes aren’t more common, but murders go up with the temperature. 

Likewise, researchers find that police officers are more likely to draw and fire their weapons during a training session conducted on a hot day.

In Tanzania in any season, elderly women are sometimes accused of witchcraft and hacked or beaten to death. Professor Miguel has found that unusual weather linked to climate change — either drought or heavy rainfall — is associated with a doubling in the number of these “witch” killings.

(via Temperatures Rise, and We’re Cooked)

Looking At Austin’s Exports

Austin_Exports_Brookings.pdf
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