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The Future Of Wind At RETECH2012

Dropped off wind power poster at son's 1st gra...

With an industry tax credit in jeopardy and new projects at a virtual standstill in the U.S., you might have expected the wind industry to come limping into RETECH2012. Instead, the audience heard from a sector that’s honing in on what it can control — namely cost reductions and innovation.

“We haven’t placed any orders for turbines for 2013,” said First Wind’s Julia Bovey in the opening remarks. That’s been the norm in 2012 for wind developers and turbine manufacturers as utilities and power purchasers have adopted a wait-and-see approach when it comes to the Production Tax Credit (PTC).

As a result, she added, three primary drivers have taken hold: reducing costs, improving turbine technology, and accessing capital in different ways.

Life Beyond The PTC

While the PTC has taken up much of the industry’s focus, wind proponents like Bovey and other green advocates are pushing for other ways to access capital. Two that have captured the discussion recently are master limited partnerships (MLPs) and real estate investment trusts (REITs). Both are used by oil and gas companies and have driven more than $300 billion in private investment. Here’s the way it was described in a NYT Op-Ed piece.

“Some economists and green tech entrepreneurs have advocated a change in federal tax law to allow renewable energy companies to use a tax-advantaged investment device known as a master limited partnership, which has attracted $350 billion in private investment but is limited to oil and gas extraction and pipeline projects. Another proposal is to allow real estate investment trusts, which are like mutual funds for real estate, to cover energy transmission networks and renewable energy generation.”

The wind industry says the subsidy discussion is really about equal footing. An LA Times report showed how lopsided it can seem depending on the data being analyzed.

“Fossil-fuel producers reap tax accounting breaks such as the depletion allowance, which is worth an estimated $1 billion a year, according to the Environmental and Energy Study Institute, a Washington think tank created to advise Congress on energy policy. Tax-expensing options for drillers bring them $1.9 billion a year. Relief on royalty payments due to drillers on government property: $53 billion over the lifetime of the leases.”

However the subsidies play out, panelists agreed something similar to the current renewable portfolio standard should be a goal. As much of a hot potato that it might be politically, more than thirty states are already enrolled to spark renewable growth. As one of the speakers mentioned, RPS is the closest thing we have to a national clean energy standard.

Innovation Brings Multiple Benefits  

The pace of innovation in the wind business was certainly one of the bright spots. Taylor Geer, with energy consultancy Garrad Hassan, said turbine efficiency and reliability have improved dramatically over the last five years, something he attributes to better manufacturing processes and more R&D earmarked for things like forecasting and storage.

“We definitely have a better idea of what we need to look like within three-to-five years,” said Geer. “Not to mention we’re getting a better sense of what our cost of energy will be, and that’s a big lift.” Like other panelists, Greer emphasized the impact that energy storage would have on levelizing electricity costs. As the storage infrastructure improves, most agreed wind farms would likely resemble a generation model closer to conventional power plants.

To get a sense of how fast turbine technology is evolving, you can look at “repowering” efforts, which replace older turbines with new ones. According to Jeff Schlichting at wind developer Sustainable Legacy, one turbine can now replace up to five others as wind farms are upgraded.

Taking Costs Out Of The System

Cost reduction was another area where technology improvements are having an impact. But it’s not just better rotor technology or lighter materials that are helping, it’s supply chain efficiencies and the way wind farms are commissioned. “As the industry has matured, we’ve gotten better at everything from construction to logistics,” said Schlichting. “

And perhaps a sign of that maturity was the fact that IBM was on hand to address the operations and management (O&M) market for wind. According to Biren Gandhi of IBM Global Business Services, O&M costs can approach one-third of the total capital expenditures for a wind farm.
The company was pitching its IT-driven approach to managing large-scale wind operations, experience that it’s gained from running big servers and cloud applications for customers in the automotive industry and other manufacturing-intensive operations. IBM projects the O&M market could grow by as much as $6 billion over the next decade.

SXSWECO Session: Startups And Corporations: Bringing Clean Technology To Market

Cleantech Group’s Greg Neichin Moderating

Cleantech Group‘s Greg Neichin opened up Wednesday’s panel “Startups and Corporations: Bringing Clean Technology to Market” with an important observation.  The cleantech market, and certainly the broader energy energy space, is a bit different when it comes to getting big companies in the same room with startups.

“For the most part, they tend to get along,” he told a packed session.

The session assembled a good mix of panelists, from a startup and venture capital firm to sustainability executives from Nike and Intel.

Nike’s Dan Cherian described its approach to working with startups, and dispelled the notion that its startup relationships are purely investment-oriented.

“We don’t just do investments, we’re involved in things like licensing, joint development agreements and strategic alliances, ” Cherian explained. “Not all of our innovation happens inside the company, we think of it as strategic partnering and investing,” he added.  As Cherian summarized Nike’s view, it was clear the company sees sustainability as as a growth opportunity, with Cherian saying Nike is “heavily invested” in  helping the company grow through sustainable business.

Intel’s Lorie Wigle and Rockport Capital’s Dhiraj Malkani

Intel’s Lorie Wigle, the company’s GM of Eco-Tech, said much of its startup work is focused on energy efficiency. Specifically, her team looks at the application of technology  and how to grow revenue. Wigle mentioned a joint project with KLG Systal that tackled water management. Through KLG and other partners, Intel was able to see their technology implemented in different ways, underscoring the importance of tightening up your partner network before approaching larger corporations.

On that note, Streetline‘s CEO Zia Yusuf brought some street-level (not intended)  levity to the big company pitch discussion.

“Many startups make the  mistake of thinking ‘we got the meeting’ and the ”number of meetings’ are a good metric for progress,” said Yusuf.  His assertion was those elements have nothing to do with success . “It gets down to can the corporation sell more of their product because of what you do.”

Nike’s Cherian concurred, urging young companies to make their objectives very clear. “If your objectives are clear, we (Nike) have the right people in place for you to interface with”, he explained. He says Nike has three or four areas set up  within the company to address various segments of innovation.

“Even if you talk to the business development group or venture unit, you have to realize they might not have the decision-making capability, ” he said. “When we get a message from a company, we apply that correspondence to whichever filter is the best fit.” Cherian added one other tidbit for the startup crowd: get a recommendation. He said even the slightest nod from a known partner or third-party can help startups in the early cycles with various corporate groups.

Another key discussion was the role large corporations can play in developing industry standards.

Streetline’s Yusuf mentioned their partnership with IBM, where they’ve integrated Big Blue’s Cognos platform. He stressed how important it was to understand the dynamics of the marketplace and who’s pushing open technology.

“Startups should know who leads the market and what products are innovating, ” said Yusuf.  “IBM would love to sell us a bunch of their products, but we know which pieces of their platform help us solve our customers’ problems.”

Intel’s Wigle mentioned the company’s involvement in the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel and how much intelligence it’s captured from the ecosystem as technology is commercialized.  Because Intel has some much infrastructure that startups need, the company established its own incubation program, of sorts.  Technology Days brings together startups in Intel’s portfolio and allows them to make their pitch. Not only can Intel share its R&D practices and standards work, but young companies get a purview of what’s coming down the technology pipe.

The panel bridged some of the standards discussion with a few examples of where data and technology are currently coming together for disruption. All of them agreed the “internet of things” was shaking things up the most around cleantech innovation. With smart sensors, advanced levels of automation, and the move to open data, companies like Fitbit and Nest were cited as two companies capitalizing on the standards push.

If startups should come away with anything, it’s take the time to get your ship in order before approaching the big guys. If you’re focused, have the right partners, and understand protocol, they’re listening.

Sample Report Generated From An IBM Assessment Tool For Collaboration

Sample_Report_IBM_Collab_Assessment.pdf
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Smart Grids and Smart Buildings From Johnson Controls and IBM

IBM Smarter Planet Initiative

Image via Wikipedia

If you haven’t bookmarked IBM’s Smarter Planet microblog, get to it. They do a great job highlighting all sorts of tools and technologies that help cities and communities move towards sustainability.  For you techies, it’s also an excellent example of a big company using a simple tool like Tumblr to create and share information.  I pulled the image here from a Johnson Controls’ post looking at the day in the life of a smart building manager. We need more simple depictions like this to break things down and normalize what a smarter building really means. A lot of it boils down to the low-hanging fruit like monitoring energy usage and better automation around power management.
 

 

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My Kind Of Supply Chain Visibility – IBM Forcing Suppliers To Become Sustainably Compliant

Image representing IBM as depicted in CrunchBase

Image via CrunchBase

Say what you want about the big corporate machines, but the fact is they set the agenda (too much at times) for many things. Industry standards, supply and demand, and of course best practices for things like sustainability. A company like IBM has a massive amount of buying power. If they pressure their supply chain, it will adjust.

IBM isn’t giving suppliers a deadline for compliance, but the company hopes that changes will be complete by 2011. And if suppliers don’t get on board, IBM will eventually take its business elsewhere. They won’t be able to hide from sustainability audits for long–now that both Wal-Mart and IBM are on board, it’s only a matter of time before other big companies start demanding the same things.

 

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