Some Perspective On The Growth Of Solar

ThinkProgress points us to some pretty astounding numbers on solar growth. This kind of data makes you  question the rationale behind all the clean energy rollbacks.

“The U.S. solar industry currently has more than 260,000 workers nationwide, according to The Solar Foundation. Their executive director, Andrea Luecke, points out that’s more workers than “Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon combined.” (As a point of clarification, Amazon has added jobs at a torrid pace in the last couple of years, so the 260,000 solar jobs is ‘only’ more than Apple, Google, and Facebook combined.)”

Things Aren’t Always Rosy In Cities

We hear a lot about cities and how much they contribute to GDP and innovation but there’s more to it than just business serendipity and hangouts for the Creative Class. Derek Thompson wrote a good piece on what’s happening in New York and what it says about larger trends.

“Urban planners and economists focused on creativity and networks have been singing the praises of the city-living since the Great Recession (or, perhaps, since forever). But local housing policy, limited family finances, and American geographical abundance—not to mention the pro-rural laws of U.S. representative government—are powerful centrifugal forces that push Americans ever-outward into suburbs with lawns, trucks, and cul de sacs. The last decade was a dream. It’s 2006, again.”

Testing Out The Nissan LEAF

One of our cars is crawling along these days and though we we’re not excited about buying another vehicle, we are excited about what type of vehicle it will be. Yes, you guessed it, an electric!  After years of researching, a few drives here and there, and much advocacy, we’re planning to dive in head first.

Since we haven’t bought a car in years, there’s a lot of ground to cover. And adding in the electric vehicle (EV) component arguably compounds the legwork required to make sure we getting a good deal and minimizing obsolescence.  The search got underway in Albany, NY when I drove a Nissan Leaf.  In short, I was really impressed with how it handled. It felt like a solid car without all the noise and rumbling of a combustible engine — something you have to experience to appreciate.  We’ve been looking for a used one in Upstate NY but not seeing too much inventory.  I’ll have more updates soon.